●Soldiers of the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division relax at Pope Air Force Base, N.C., prior to loading into aircraft for an airdrop on May 7, 2000. The paratroopers are jumping into Pope Air Force Base for the opening ceremonies of Air Mobility Rodeo 2000. Rodeo 2000 is the U.S. Air Force Air Mobility Command’s premier air mobility competition, involving more than 80 aircraft and 100 teams from 17 countries. The teams compete in airdrops, aerial refueling, aircraft navigation, special tactics, short field landings, cargo loading, engine running on and off load, aeromedical evacuations and security forces operations. The 82nd is based at Fort Bragg, N.C.  
●DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Jerry Morrison, U.S. Air Force.

●Soldiers of the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division relax at Pope Air Force Base, N.C., prior to loading into aircraft for an airdrop on May 7, 2000. The paratroopers are jumping into Pope Air Force Base for the opening ceremonies of Air Mobility Rodeo 2000. Rodeo 2000 is the U.S. Air Force Air Mobility Command’s premier air mobility competition, involving more than 80 aircraft and 100 teams from 17 countries. The teams compete in airdrops, aerial refueling, aircraft navigation, special tactics, short field landings, cargo loading, engine running on and off load, aeromedical evacuations and security forces operations. The 82nd is based at Fort Bragg, N.C. 

●DoD photo by Staff Sgt. Jerry Morrison, U.S. Air Force.

● The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the intratheater portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for paradropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. Basic and specialized versions perform a diversity of roles, including airlift support, DEW Line and Arctic ice resupply, aeromedical missions, aerial spray missions, fire-fighting duties for the US Forest Service, and natural disaster relief missions. In recent years, they have been used to bring humanitarian relief to many countries, including Haiti, Bosnia, Somalia, and Rwanda.

● The C-130 Hercules primarily performs the intratheater portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for paradropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. Basic and specialized versions perform a diversity of roles, including airlift support, DEW Line and Arctic ice resupply, aeromedical missions, aerial spray missions, fire-fighting duties for the US Forest Service, and natural disaster relief missions. In recent years, they have been used to bring humanitarian relief to many countries, including Haiti, Bosnia, Somalia, and Rwanda.

A F-14, part of the “Jolly Rogers” Squadron, landing aboard an aircraft carrier. 
●The Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103 is one of the most famous squadrons in the U.S. Navy. The unit has gained a certain popularity over the year thanks to the famous squadron markings they gained when the Sluggers (as the squadron was nicknamed until then)  became the Jolly Rogers and adopted the most recognizable symbol in Naval Aviation: Ensign Jack Ernie’s skull-and-crossbones on all-black tails.
VFA-103 is actually the third squadron to use the name and symbol of the Jolly Rogers:despite being different units, with no “lineal descent” from one another, both VF-61 (originally VF-17), VF-84, and VFA-103 have shared the same name, insignia and traditions.
When the Jolly Rogers were still equipped with the F-14 Tomcat (they now fly the F/A-18F Super Hornet) the Fighter Squadron (VF) 84, they took part in two movies.

A F-14, part of the “Jolly Rogers” Squadron, landing aboard an aircraft carrier.

●The Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103 is one of the most famous squadrons in the U.S. Navy. The unit has gained a certain popularity over the year thanks to the famous squadron markings they gained when the Sluggers (as the squadron was nicknamed until then)  became the Jolly Rogers and adopted the most recognizable symbol in Naval Aviation: Ensign Jack Ernie’s skull-and-crossbones on all-black tails.

VFA-103 is actually the third squadron to use the name and symbol of the Jolly Rogers:despite being different units, with no “lineal descent” from one another, both VF-61 (originally VF-17), VF-84, and VFA-103 have shared the same name, insignia and traditions.

When the Jolly Rogers were still equipped with the F-14 Tomcat (they now fly the F/A-18F Super Hornet) the Fighter Squadron (VF) 84, they took part in two movies.

Two AFCC Operators calling a C-130J to land in a sand airstrip in Afghanistan. 
●United States Air Force Combat Control Teams, singular Combat Controller, (CCT) (AFSC 1C2X1) are ground combat forces specialized in a traditional pathfinder role while having a heavy emphasis on simultaneous air traffic control, fire support and command, control, and communications in covert or austere environments.

Two AFCC Operators calling a C-130J to land in a sand airstrip in Afghanistan.

●United States Air Force Combat Control Teams, singular Combat Controller, (CCT) (AFSC 1C2X1) are ground combat forces specialized in a traditional pathfinder role while having a heavy emphasis on simultaneous air traffic control, fire support and command, control, and communications in covert or austere environments.

● the Navy is teaching a new a new dog-fighting technique that does away with guns and missiles. I understand it’s called Aircraft Wrestling. These are photos of a pair of F-18 Hornets at Top Gun which had a mid-air collision and then the pilots “John Wayned” them back to base. Anyone has got to be NUTS to be a Naval Aviator.
Hook down - hydraulics gone - incredible… This truly is a miracle; two heavily damaged aircraft. The pilots would have been justified in “punching out” but instead, they chose to bring the jets in. This endangered their lives but saved the taxpayers about 80 million dollars. The story behind them is: Two F/A-18 Hornets from Top Gun were Dogfighting and made a head on pass, just a bit too close.

● the Navy is teaching a new a new dog-fighting technique that does away with guns and missiles. I understand it’s called Aircraft Wrestling. These are photos of a pair of F-18 Hornets at Top Gun which had a mid-air collision and then the pilots “John Wayned” them back to base. Anyone has got to be NUTS to be a Naval Aviator.
Hook down - hydraulics gone - incredible… This truly is a miracle; two heavily damaged aircraft. The pilots would have been justified in “punching out” but instead, they chose to bring the jets in. This endangered their lives but saved the taxpayers about 80 million dollars. The story behind them is: Two F/A-18 Hornets from Top Gun were Dogfighting and made a head on pass, just a bit too close.